PHOTO INTERPRETER'S GUIDE TO JAPANESE MILITARY INSTALLATIONS
1945.


[PART III.]

PHOTO INTERPRETER'S GUIDE TO JAPANESE MILITARY INSTALLATIONS

MILITARY INTELLIGENCE DIVISION
1 SEPTEMBER 1945
WAR DEPARTMENT
WASHINGTON, D.C.

SECTION XIII. COAST DEFENSE ARTILLERY



A considerable variety of coast defense guns have been mounted in Japanese installations encountered to date. Most of these have been naval guns, which in many cases have been removed along with their turrets and mountings from the decks of warships and placed in shore positions. Others have been guns of naval design, adapted for coast defense use. The Japanese have also used a considerable number of British weapons, and field artillery has been used for emergency coast defense. Dual-purpose batteries have played an important part in the Japanese coast defense system. The number of guns in a Japanese coast defense battery is not fixed.

76.2-MM NAVAL GUN

This is a naval gun originally purchased from the British and copied with Japanese variations.

This is a naval gun originally purchased from the British and copied with Japanese variations

Characteristics

Length of tube ... 10 feet
Maximum range ... 8,700 yards
Traverse ... 360 degrees
Elevation .. -6 to +20 degrees
Battery layout ... One-to three-gun batteries.
Revetments ... Usually square covered emplacements.
Fire control ... No external fire control equipment. Firing is done by direct laying.
Mount—Fixed pedestal.

76.2-mm naval guns in coast defense positions captured by the Marines at Tarawa

76.2-mm naval guns in coast defense positions captured by the Marines at Tarawa.

TYPE 3 (1914) 120-MM NAVAL GUN

This naval-type gun is found ashore with or without the shield. The recoil mechanism above the tube is similar in appearance to that of the Type 10 dual-purpose gun of the same caliber.

Characteristics

Length of tube .... 17 feet 6 inches
Maximum range ... 16,500 yards
Traverse ... 360 degrees
Elevation ... —5 to +55 degrees
Battery layout ... One- to four-gun batteries, usually in a straight line along the shore
Revetments ... 20 to 25 feet inner diameter.
Fire control ... No external fire control equipment has been found with captured batteries. However, a 2-meter base range finder may be used. Firing was conducted in the batteries captured to date by direct sighting combined with range scales.
Mount ... Pedestal.
Shield ... Approximately 8 by 13 feet, often removed.

Type 3 120-mm gun on Los Negros

Type 3 120-mm gun on Los Negros.

120-mm gun in position on Guam

120-mm gun in position on Guam.

Scale 1:6,750, Iwo Jima, 120-mm dual-purpose battery

Scale 1:6,750, Iwo Jima, 120-mm dual-purpose battery.

120mm gun on Baanga liland, Solomons.



120 mm Qun capturtd on Lot Negros, Admlralty Group,

Four-gun 120-mm battery with shields on Wake lsland.

Scale 1:10,000. 120-mm battery on Saipan,

Oblique of Saipan 120-mm battery.

120-MM 40-CAUBER NAVAL GUN

Four of these guns were captured at Kiska, one of which is shown in the photograph above. Two were made by Armstrong-Whitworth and two were Japanese copies.

Characteristics

Length of barrel (including breech mechanism) . . . . 16 feet 6 inches
Revetments ... Approximately 20 feet inner diameter
Fire control ... 2-meter base range finder, plotting room, and binoculars
Mount ... Pedestal, set in concrete.

Scale 1:675 (approximately). A four-gun 120-mm 40-caliber battery with ronge finder and learchtights.

TYPE 3 (1914) 140-MM NAVAL GUN

This naval-type gun has been found both with a deck-type shield and mounted in a hand-operated naval casemate shield. It is the most common coast defense gun used by the Japanese. When emplaccd ashore the shield is often removed.

Characteristics

Length of tube ... 22 feet 11 inches
Length including shield ... 24 feet
Maximum range ... 18,700 yards
Elevation ... —7 to +30 degrees
Traverse ... 360 degrees
Battery layout ... Two- and three-gun batteries. A tower is usually present for observation.
Revetments ... 34 to 37 feet inner diameter. Sometimes concrete construction is used. Revetments are not always used.
Fire control ... Binoculars and a 2-meter base range finder are often mounted on the observation tower.
Mount ... Fixed pedestal with a large spade buried beneath it when concrete is used.
Shield ... Deck type, almost square with the front corners rounded. Breech does not project beyond the shield. There is a prominent bump on the top of the shield at the left and two windows in the front. Dimensions: 7 feet 2.5 inches by 9 feet 4 inches.

Type 3 140-mm gun empfaced for coast defense at Tarawa, Note bump on top of shield and windows in the front.

Type 3 140-mm naval gun emplaced at Enogai Inlet, New Georgia, without shield

140-mm guns in position at Tamari.



Scale 1:2,555. Noted on the photographs are (A) 140-mm guns, (B) tower, (C) searchlight.

This oblique stereo-pair shows a two-gun 140-mm battery at Tarawa. The observation tower has been destroyed.

Type 3 140-mm gun captured at Saipan,

150-MM 40-CALIBER NAVAL GUN

This gun was manufactured by Armstrong-Whit worth and copied by the Kure Naval Arsenal. It is customarily mounted on ships, but has been captured ashore.

Characteristics

Length of barrel (including breech mechanism) ... .21 feet (approximately)
Battery layout ... Two, three, or four guns per battery, usually in a straight line or a slight arc, with a centrally located fire control building and range finder.
Revetments ... 26 to 30 feet inner diameter Co crete-covered emplacements 29 feet ?\ 24.5 feet have been captured.
Fire control ... Plotting rooms, 2-meter base finders, and binoculars,
Mount ... Fixed pedestal.
Shield ... Wedge-shaped, approximately 6 feet by 6 feet. Breech projects beyond the shield The top of the shield is inclined sharply at the rear with two small windows in the inclined portion.

150-mm 40-caliber novel gun in shore emplacement.

Scale 1:4,075. 150-mm 40-cafiber naval guns in coast defense positions on Kiska.

Scale 1:5,756. 150-mm 40-caliber naval guns emplaced on Little Kiska

An oblique of 150-mm 40-caliber guns in positlon

Scale 1:4,000. 150-mm guns at Maloelap Atoll

150-mm 40-caliber naval gun captured on Little Kiska,

TYPE 41 (1908) 150-MM 45-CALI8ER NAVAL GUN

This gun resembles the 150-mm 40-caliber gun. Though no shields have been reported yet it is known that on naval vessels it has been fitted with both types of shields used with the 150-mm 40-caliber gun.

Characteristics

Maximum range ... 20,700 yards
Traverse ... 360 degrees
Elevation ... -5 t0 +3° degrees
Mount ... Pedestal.
Shield ... With or without cruiser or naval casemate shield.

Type 41 150-mm 45-caliber gun partially emplaced at Biak.

These two photograph show what is believed to be the Type 41 150-mm 50-caliber gun emplaced on Guam.

TYPE 41 (1908) 150-MM 50-CALIBER NAVAL GUN

While the guns shown in the illustrations have not been positively identified as the 150-mm 50-caliber gun, it is believed that they illustrate an improved form of either the 45- or 50-caliber 150-mm guns. On the guns illustrated, counterweights are attached above the tube behind the trunnions.

Characteristics

Length of tube ... 25 feet 10 inches
Maximum range ... 15,800 yards
Traverse ... 360 degrees
Elevation ... -5 to +15 degrees
Battery layout ... Three guns in a battery.
Revetments ... 31 feet inner diameter.
Mount-Pedestal.
Shield—None.

TYPE 3 (T943) 200-MM SHORT NAVAL GUN

This gun was designed for use on merchant vessels for antiaircraft and antisubmarine protection. A similar weapon with a 120-rnm bore is known to have been produced but has not been identified in action. The 200-mm guns captured were used only for coastal defense. The gun has a swinging arm at the left rear for loading.

Specifications

Length of tube ... 6 feet 8 inches
Maximum range ... 6,900 yards (horizontal) 10,750 feet (vertical)
Traverse ... 360 degrees
Elevation ... -15 to +65 degrees
Battery layout ... Usually two guns per battery. They are found around strategic beaches for use in an antiboat role.
Revetments ... Usually concrete, covered emplacements, sometimes open. Rectangular (10 by JO to 15 feet) and circular (12 to 25 feet inner diameter). Emplacements often built into the sides of hills and cliffs.
Fire control ... No external fire control has been identified with this weapon. However, a range finder should be expected.
Mount ... Pedestal, 5-foot diameter at base.
Shield ... None.

Type 3 (1943) 200-mm gun captured on Guam

Two view of 200-mm gun captured onPeleliu.

Scale 1: 6,650. Four-gun 200-mm gun battery on Iwo Jima.

Scale 1: 6,650. This stereo-pair taken on Iwo Jima shows a probable 200-mm gun emplacement under construction and a possible two-gun battery, camouflaged, covering beech and landing area.

200-MM 45-CALIBER GUN

Characteristics

Length of barrel beyond shield ... 19 feet 2 inches
Length of barrel and shield ... 38 feet 10 inches
Battery layout ... Batteries of two guns with an observation tower and a large ammunition building. A small-gauge railroad is used to transport ammunition from the building to the gun.
Revetments ... 37 to 39 feet inner diameter, concrete construction, A 12-inch steel ammunition trough about 2 feet high almost encircles the gun. A ready ammunition building approximately 17 feet by 10 feet is always located in the rear of the revetment.
Fire control ... Observation tower with range finder and director mounted on one of the lower levels. Mount—Pedestal, placed in concrete or on a large spade buried in the ground.
Shield ... Shield extends about halfway back along an approximately rectangular platform. It is rounded in front and tapered toward the rear. There is a door on each side and two windows in front. Canvas is stretched over the entire shield and platform giving the impression of a continuous shield.

Photograph of 200-mm gun at Tarawa with canvas cover.

200-mm guns in a tandem emplacement at Tarawa

This oblique photo shows the same installation as the vertical photograph above. The ammunition building has been destroyed by a direct bomb hit.

Scale 1:1,555 (approximately). This is a two-gun battery on Wake Island. Note construction of tower for range finder.

Scale 1:1,760 (approximately). These photographs show that tho range finder has been installed in the new tower.

240-MM 26-CALIBER GUN

This heavy coast defense weapon is reported right of the top carriage elevates the gun. The to have a maximum range of approximately mount is traversed by two men using cranks on 10400 yards. One man at a handwheel at the each side of the chassis at the front.

240-mm 26-caliber gun.

Four-gun 240-mm 26-caliber coast defense battery.

280-MM HOWITZER

This coast defense howitzer has a maximum range of approximately 8,300 yards. The piece can be elevated by two men at handwheels on either side of the front of the top carriage to more than 65 degrees. The howitzer fires onlv above 45 degrees. The mount is traversed bv men at two cranks on each side of the chassis at the rear.

280-mm coast defenie howitzers

SECTION XIV. SEMI-MOBILE HEAVY ARTILLERY AND RAILWAY GUNS



Semi-mobile heavy guns may be mourned in batteries of two or more guns and they are usually easy to detect because of the size of the emplacements or casemates. A considerable amount of construction activity will be apparent. Railway guns can be fired from semicircular gun spurs constructed on the main railway line, or they can be fired from railway turntables

TYPE 45 (1912) 150-MM GUN

The characteristics of this Japanese Army gun are not known. In the photograph above the Type 45 is shown being employed. Note platform struts and rails on which tho cFane travels. The shield is being raised from its transport wogon. The photograph below shows the gun in recoil.

TYPE 45 (1912) 240-MM HOWITZER

It is reported that this piece has a maximum weighing approximately 400 pounds. It is brok range of 11,000 yards, firing a semi-fixed round down and transported on 10 vehicles.

Type 45 (1912) 240-mm howitzer.



Typo 45 240-mm howitzer In action. Note revetment.

Depressing the tube of the Type 45 240mm howitzer into loading position,

Type 45 240-mm howilzer in action,

MISCELLANEOUS TYPES

The Japanese have bought 170-mm, sio-mm, and 240-mm weapons from Germany, and therefore Japanese copies of these may be expected. In addition, the following heavy artillery pieces have been reported, but none has been captured Therefore, the characteristics given beJow have not been confirmed.

Caliber Type Length of Bore (inches) Muzzle Velocity (feet per second) Range (yards)
240-mm Type 90 (1930) railway gun 482 3,440 54,500
305-mm 305-mm Type 7 (1918) short howitzer 196 1,310 12,750
305-mm Type 7 (1918) long howitzer 324 1,140 16,600
410-mm Howitzer (siege) 538 1,760 21,200


240-mm Schneider, railway mount. It is reported that 30 of these railway guns were purchased by the Japanese in 1929.

This photo shows dead-end spurs under construction. Two appeare to be covered in an attempt to camouflage whatever type rolling stock may be stabled here. Note the camouflaged railway car on the extreme left side of the photographs and also the antiaircraft positions.

Camouflage with an attempt to hide locomotive.

SECTION XV. VEHICLES

 

TYPE 99 (1933) SCOUT CAR

This light-weight, unarmed reconnaissance vehicle was developed following the Manchurian Incident, when ihe need for an all-purpose scout car became pressing. There are four-passenger (shown above) and Iwo-passenger (shown below) body types.

Specifications

Weight ... 2,590 pounds
Length ... 11 feet 4 inches
Width ... 5 feet 2 inches
Height ... 5 feet 3 inches

Scale 7 Inches: 100 feet. Scout car made into a light pickup truck, photographed at Rabaut.

STANDARD NISSAN FIVE-PASSENGER SEDAN

This vehicle is used as a passenger staff car.

Specifications

Weight ... 3,108 pounds
Length ... 15 feet 6 inches
Width ... 5 feet 7.5 inches
Height ... 5 feet 9 inches

Scale 7 inches: 100 feet. Nissan sedans photographed at Rabaul. (1)

Nissan sedans photographed at Rabaul. (2)

Nissan sedans photographed at Rabaul. (3)

CAB-OVER-ENGINE TRUCK

This truck is used for transport of cargo and personnel. The original model, produced in 1937- was a combination of Graham-Paige and Japanese design.

Specifications

Length ... 14 feet 1.4 inches
Width ... 6 feet 8 inches

Low altitude oblique.



5cale 1:3,755, Japanese truck on Saipan road, believed to be the cab-over-engine model.

TYPE 1 (1941) TOYODA TRUCK

This model is almost an exact copy of the 1939 Chevrolet truck. It is used as a transport-cargo vehicle. Like other Japanese trucks it may appear with several different body types. Several different truck designs, including American models, are used by the Japanese Army.

Specifications

Weight ... 5,500 pounds
Length .. 18 feet 10 inches
Width ... 6 feet 4 inches
Height ... 7 feet 5 inches

Oblique photographs showing trucks used by the Japanese. (1)

Oblique photographs showing trucks used by the Japanese. (2)

Oblique photographs showing trucks used by the Japanese. (3)

Oblique photographs showing trucks used by the Japanese. All but the vehicle shown top left appear to be Type 1 Toyoda trucks. (1)

Scale 1:3,755, Japanese truck on Saipan.



Scale 7:6,650. Trucks parked in dispersal area on Iwo Jima

TYPE 92A (1932) 5-TON PRIME MOVER



Specifications

Weight ... 5.28 tons
Length ... 11 feet 8 inches
Width ... 5 feet 11 inches
Height ... 7 feet 8 inches

TYPE 98 (1938) 4-TON PRIME MOVER

This vehicle is suitable for the additional roles of reconnaissance vehicle and ammunition carrier. It carries a crew of seven men.



Specifications

Weight ... 4 tons
Length ... 12 feet 5 inches
Width ... 6 feet 1 inch
Height ... 7 feet 3 inches

COMBINATION PRIME MOVER AND WRECKER



This vehicle, in addition to its function as a prime mover and wrecker, may have been used as a tank-recovery vehicle. The vehicle has total seating space for 13 men- It has two front booms (which may be operated independently), and a removable rear boom (not shown in the photographs).

Specifications

Length (over-all) ... 20 feet S inches
Length (less arms) ... 17 feet
Width ... 7 feet 5.5 inches
Height ... 7 feet 11 inches

TYPE 92 (1932) TANKETTE

The turret of this tankette has been mounted to the rear of the chassis, giving the vehicle a boot-like appearance.

Specifications

Weight ... .3 tons
Length ... 10 feet 3 inches
Width ... 5 feet 3 inches
Height ... 5 feet 4 inches
Crew ... 2 men
Armament ... One machine gun

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 25 miles per hour
Range ... 100 miles
Gradient ... 27 degrees
Trench crossing ... 4 feet 6 inches wide
Step ... 2 feet 1 inch high
Fording ... 2 feet deep

TYPE 94 (1934) TANKETTE

This tankette embodies the general design features of the Type 92, except "that the small rear idler of the Type 92 has been replaced by a large trailing idler.

Specifications

Weight .. 3-4 tons
Length ... 11 feet
Width ... 5 feet 3 inches
Height ... 5 feet 4 inches
Crew ... 2 men
Armament ... One machine

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 26 miles per hour
Range ... 100 miles
Gradient ... 27 to 30 degrees
Trench crossing ... 4 feet 6 inches wide
Fording ... 2 feet deep

TYPE 97 (1937) TANKETTE

Prominent features of this tank are the raised front drive sprocket and the enlarged turret required by the 37-mm gun.

Specifications

Weight ... 4.8 tons
Length ... 12 feet
Width ... 6 feet 4 inches
Height ... 5 feet 11 inches
Crew ... 2 men
Armament ... One 37-mm gun and one 7.7-mm machine gun

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 28 miles per hour
Range ... 100 miles
Gradient ... 30 degrees
Trench crossing ... 5 feet 3 inches wide
Step ... 1 foot 8 inches high
Fording ... 2 feet 6 inches deep

Ground photograph of Type 97 (1937) tanketta.

TYPE 93 (1933) LIGHT TANK

This light tank has a box-type hull with a suspension system including six small bogies on each side and three return rollers. The turret is small, high, and rounded with tapered sides.

Specifications

Weight ... 7.8 tons
Length ... 14 feet 8 inches
Width ... 5 feet 11 inches
Height .... 6 feet
Crew ... 3 men
Armament ... Two machine guns

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 28 miles per hour
Range ... 125 miles
Gradient ... 35 degrees
Trench crossing ... 5 feet 8 inches wide
Step ... 1 foot 6 inches high
Fording ... 2 feet 8 inches deep

Ground photograph of Type 95 (1935) fight tank.

TYPE 95 (1935) LIGHT TANK


This is the Japanese standard light tank. It is a full-track combat vehicle with four large bogies and two return rollers on each side.

Specifications

Weight ... 8.4 tons
Length ... 14 feet 4,5 inches
Width ... 6 feet 9 inches
Height ... 7 feet 2 inches
Armament ... One 37-mm gun and two machine guns

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 28 to 30 miles per hour
Range ... 90 to 110 miles
Gradient ... 30 to 45 degrees
Trench crossing ... 6 feet wide
Step ... 2 feet 8 inches high
Fording ... 3 feet 3 inches deep

TYPE 89A (1929) MEDIUM TANK

Identification features of this tank include the Armament One 57-mm gun and box-shaped hull, skirted suspension, nine small two machine guns bodies and five return rollers.

Specifications

Weight ... 13 tons
Length ... 19 feet 3 inches
Width ... 7 feet 1 inches
Height ... 8 feet 6 inches
Crew ... 4 men
Armament ... One 57-mm gun and two machine guns

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 15 miles per hour
Range ... 100 miles
Gradient ... 34 degrees
Trench crossing ... 8 feet 3 inches wide
Step ... 2 feet 9 inches high
Fording ... 3 feet 3 inches deep

TYPE 89B (1929) MEDIUM TANK

This tank is the same as Type 89A except for a longer front plate which is combined with the driver's front plate and the new-type cupola and turret.

Specifications

Weight ... 13 tons
Length ... 19 feet 3 inches
Width ... 7 feet 1 inches
Height ... 8 feet 6 inches
Crew ... 4 men
Armament ... One 57-mm gun and two machine guns

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 15 miles per hour
Range ... 100 miles
Gradient ... 34 degrees
Trench crossing ... 8 feet 3 inches wide
Step ... 2 feet 9 inches high
Fording ... 3 feet 3 inches deep

TYPE 94 (1934) MEDIUM TANK

The skirted suspension system of the Type 94 includes nine small bogies and four return rollers. A ditching tail (shown in the photographs) has been found mounted on these tanks. Type 94 is an arbitrary designation and may be incorrect.

Specifications

Weight 15 tons
Length ... 23 feet (including ditching tail)
Width ... 7 feet 1 inch
Height ... 8 feet 6 inches
Crew 4 men
Armament ... One 57-mm gun and two machine guns

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 18 to 20 miles per hour
Range ... 100
Gradient ... 34 degrees
Trench crossing ... 9 feet Wide
Step ... 2 feet 9 inches high
Fording ... 2 feet 11 inches deep

TYPE 97 (1937) MEDIUM TANK

This Japanese tank is classed as a medium tank although it fights at about the same weight as the U. S. light tank M5A1. The suspension system includes six large bogies and three return rollers for each side.

Specifications

Weight ... 14.8 tons
Length ... 18 feet 2 inches
Width ... 7 feet 7 inches
Height ... 7 feet 9.5 inches
Crew 4 men
Armament ... One 57-mm Type 97 gun and two machine guns

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 25 miles per hour
Range ... 150 miles
Gradient ... 30 to 45 degrees
Trench crossing ... 8 feet 3 inches wide
Step ... 2 feet 6 inches highi
Fording ... 3 feet 3 inches deep



Front view of Type 97 (1937) medium tank.

Rear view of Type 97 (1937) medium tank.

TYPE 97 (1937) IMPROVED MEDIUM TANK

This improved model of the Type 97 has a longer turret than the original model to accommodate the 47-mm gun. It has been encountered in considerable numbers.

Specifications

Weight ... 15 tons
Length ... 18 feet 1 inches
Width ... 7 feet 8 inches
Height ... 7 feet 9 inches
Crew 4 or 5 men
Armament ... One 47-mm gun and two machine guns

Performance characteristics

Speed ... 27 miles per hour
Range ... 100 miles
Gradient ... 34 degrees
Trench crossing ... 8 feet 3 inches wide
Step ... 2 feet 6 inches highi
Fording ... 3 feet 3 inches deep

Captured Type 97 (1937) improved medium tank.

TYPE 2 (1942) AMPHIBIOUS TANK

This vehicle is very maneuverable in water. Its maximum speed afloat is 8 knots. The scale of the vertical view (approximately 1:50) is only half that of other vertical views in this section.



Approximate specifications

Weight ... 12.5 tons (with pontons)
Length ... 24 feet 4 inches (with pontons)
Length without pontons ... 15 feet 10 inches
Width ... 9 feet 2 inches
Height ... 7 feet 8 inches
Crew ... 3 men
Armament ... One 37-mm gun and two 7,7-mm machine guns

Performance characteristics

Speed: On land ... 23 miles per hour. Afloat ... 6 miles per hour
Range: On land ... 124 miles. Afloat ... 93 miles
Trench crossing ... 6 feet 7 inches wide
Step ... 2 feet 5 inches high

Approximate specifications

Weight 12.5 tons (with pontons)
Length. ,. 24 feet 4 inches (with pontons) Length without pontons. 15 feet 10 inches
Width 9 feet 2 inches
Height 7 feet 8 inches

Crew 3 men
Armament One 37-mm gun and two
7,7-mm machine guns
Performance characteristics
Speed: On land 23 miles per hour

h

Two amphibious tanks. Note the tracks that lead away from the area where the pontom were dropped. Oblique photograph taken in Rabauf Area.



Partially camouflaged amphibious tank. Japanese gasoline truck also shown.



Ground shot of amphibious tank without pontons.

TRUCK-LOCOMOTIVE

This combination truck-locomotive was introduccd by the Japanese in Burma to overcome the severance of rail lines and to replace destrayed locomotives. It has a Diesel engine and will pull up to 10 other vehicles. It resembles a truck in outward appearance and will operate as well on roads as on rails.

Specifications

Length ... 19 feel 2 inches
Width ... 6 feet 5 inches

Ground photograph of truck-locomotive.



Oblique photograph of truck-locomotive.

j

Vertical photograph of truck-locomotive. (1)

Vertical photograph of truck-locomotive. (1)

Japanese tractor.



Trucks, amphibious tanks, and steam shovel.



Japanese bulldozer beside steel pillbox.



Japanese passenger bus.



Gasoline truck.



Japanese tank.



Canvas-covered vehicle; one appears to be cab-over-engine truck.



Small railroad engine; trucks and grader in the background

THE END

See also:

PART I. SECTION I. PHOTO INTERPRETATION. SECTION II. TRACKS. SECTION III. TRENCHES. SECTION IV. WIRE AND MINEFIELDS. SECTION V. DEMOLITIONS AND OBSTACLES. SECTION VI. PILLBOXES AND CONCRETE STRUCTURES. SECTION VII. OBSERVATION POSTS. SECTION VIII. MACHINE GUNS.SECTION IX. MORTARS AND GRENADE DISCHARGERS

PART II. SECTION XI. ARTILLERY. SECTION XII. ANTI-AIRCRAFT ARTILLERY.